Pepi's Kitchen        </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"           </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"        

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

 
   
     
       
         
            
            
         
       
      
       
         
            
            
         
       
      
       
         
            
            
         
       
      
       
         
            
            
         
       
     
   
     

 Home RSS      Episode 3 and we’re cooking with Pepi. It’s been a while since I have known this awfully humble and kind lady. Pepi is one of the quieter women of the town of Vejer de la Frontera that you will typically meet. She has a soft and very warm approach and I was fascinated by her from the first time we met.   Why Pepi in particular? Well, I first met her whilst a student on a week long cooking course at  Annie B’s Spanish Kitchen , the very reason why I first found myself in the stunning hilltop town. Pepi was, and still works as Annie’s kitchen assistant. A petite woman with rich brunette hair and wide eyes, she is quite a model as she prepares ingredients quietly in the background for the class ahead while Annie takes you on a gastronomical journey (literally through the markets and sherry bodegas) but also at her home where she endlessly produces maps, herbs, spices and indeed wine to explain the background of the dishes to be cooked over the day. I can’t remember a time when I have seen Pepi without heels on; which trust me, is a crazy prospect if you are to ever visit and walk around the steep hills of Vejer.   I naturally gravitated to Pepi because she speaks little to no English - this was a chance for me to whack out some of the lingo I (hopefully) had learnt during my degree. Returning to Vejer in 2016 allowed me to get to know Pepi and her family. Her husband Ignacio is the well-known local barber whose barber shop is designed like a 70s living room. Furnished with plenty of wooden panels, there is a continuous stench of tobacco from his regular breaks smoking outside the front door of the shop (except not really outside). A proud, slightly macho entertainer with an impressively low-voice, I enjoyed paying Ignacio a visit. It’s safe to say I always looked very ‘local’ whenever I stepped out of Ignacio’s barbers.   I always appreciated Annie taking on a local Vejeriega from the town to assist her. Pepi loves her job and despite born, raised and still living in Vejer, she has been exposed to a host of different cultures and people through her job. And of course, who better is there to teach you an authentic Andalucían paella which features on the course. The memory I had from preparing and eating this paella gave me no choice but to cook it again for my series, but this time in Pepi’s own kitchen. In fact Pepi was delighted when I asked her, which delighted me because I was desperate to share the recipe.   Paella is a staple across the entire eastern and southern coast of Spain (from the Costa Brava in Cataluña to the Costa de la Luz in Cádiz). Unlike, for example, a Valencian paella that typically features meat (rabbit, chicken, even snails) with green beans, an Andalucían paella celebrates fish and notably shellfish. What fascinated me most about cooking this dish was that Pepi would regularly mix the rice. I was so used to leaving the dish once adding the rice because of paella rice's sensitive structure. My evening cooking with Pepi was not just a run through of a typical paella and salmorejo for starters, but a lesson in Andalucían cookery (aka a dream). My tip here is to prepare your own stock with the heads and shells of the prawns you will use and to not hold back on the saffron.   Salmorejo   Recipe found  here      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Paella de Pepi    Serves 6 - 8   You will need 3 pans for this marathon dish and a visit to the fish market is a must. A paella pan is not essential  This paella is an effort, but I can promise you now it’s completely worth it. Again, prepare your own stock…      Ingredients     Olive Oil  Onion - 1 large  Red Pepper - 1  Green Pepper - 1  Tomatoes - 4  Fresh Mussels - 1kg  Cuttlefish - 700g (calamari a good alternative)   Gambas - 500g (reserve heads & shells for stock, leaving some in their shells for decoration)  Clams - 500g  Bomba Rice - 2 cups  Stock - 6 cups  Saffron - 1/4 cup (refer to video)  Sea Salt  Monkfish - 1 fillet (filleted)   Lemon - 1  Fresh Parsley - handful      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      Method   Prepare everything - chop your veg, peel and deseed your tomatoes, clean your mussels and clams, slice your fish and fillet if required, behead and skin your prawns (reserving some for decoration) - be ready  Sofrito - heat a good glug of olive oil in your pan on a medium heat and begin by frying your chopped onion and red pepper. After a couple of minutes add the chopped green pepper and then your roughly chopped tomatoes   Mussels - boil in another pan with plenty of water for just a few minutes until they begin to open. Drain and discard any whose shells are still closed. Once cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the shells (reserving a few in their shells for decoration)  Cuttlefish - add to the main pan and coat in the sofrito.  Pepi suggests adding the fish once the water from the sofrito has evaporated   Prawn heads & shells - add olive oil to the same pan used to boil your mussels on a medium heat and fry the heads and shells of the prawns. After a few minutes add 600ml to the pan and bring to the boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down and simmer gently for at least 20 minutes  Clams - drain the stock water into another pan and discard the heads & shells of the prawns. Bring the stock back to the boil and add the clams. Boil until the shells begin to open then drain from the pan and keep for later, reserving the stock water as well. (Once cool you can remove the clam meat from their shells if you wish. I prefer to keep them intact)  Rice - add 2 cups to the main pan and coat well in the juices  Stock & Saffron - add 6 cups of stock to the pan with a really good pinch of saffron dissolved.  Pepi suggests that you add 3 cups of stock for every cup of rice   Salt - season well with sea salt and give the dish a good stir  Monkfish - once the stock soon starts to bubble, add the monkfish  Prawns, Mussels, Clams - once the rice is almost cooked (after approx. 15 minutes) stir in the raw prawns with the cooked mussels and clams. Mix again. When the prawns have turned pink, turn the heat off and leave to rest.  Pepi says there should still be some liquid left at this point    Add olive oil to a separate pan and fry the reserved prawns in their shells on a high heat until pink  Decorate the dish with the prawns and muscles in their shells, lemon wedges and fresh parsley     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


    

 

   

     
       Subscribe 
        Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.  
     

     

       

        

        

          
             
               Email Address 
               
             
          

        

          

        

       

       
            Sign Up    
       

     

    
        
    

      Hey guys. I'm Tim and I'm on a mission. I'm on a mission to go to the heart of communities around the Mediterranean and cook with the locals. It's how I can best combine my passion for cooking and speaking languages. By doing this I hope to feed you as well. Thank you very much for subscribing. 

Pepi's Kitchen

pepione
pepithree
pepiseven

Episode 3 and we’re cooking with Pepi. It’s been a while since I have known this awfully humble and kind lady. Pepi is one of the quieter women of the town of Vejer de la Frontera that you will typically meet. She has a soft and very warm approach and I was fascinated by her from the first time we met. 

Why Pepi in particular? Well, I first met her whilst a student on a week long cooking course at Annie B’s Spanish Kitchen, the very reason why I first found myself in the stunning hilltop town. Pepi was, and still works as Annie’s kitchen assistant. A petite woman with rich brunette hair and wide eyes, she is quite a model as she prepares ingredients quietly in the background for the class ahead while Annie takes you on a gastronomical journey (literally through the markets and sherry bodegas) but also at her home where she endlessly produces maps, herbs, spices and indeed wine to explain the background of the dishes to be cooked over the day. I can’t remember a time when I have seen Pepi without heels on; which trust me, is a crazy prospect if you are to ever visit and walk around the steep hills of Vejer. 

I naturally gravitated to Pepi because she speaks little to no English - this was a chance for me to whack out some of the lingo I (hopefully) had learnt during my degree. Returning to Vejer in 2016 allowed me to get to know Pepi and her family. Her husband Ignacio is the well-known local barber whose barber shop is designed like a 70s living room. Furnished with plenty of wooden panels, there is a continuous stench of tobacco from his regular breaks smoking outside the front door of the shop (except not really outside). A proud, slightly macho entertainer with an impressively low-voice, I enjoyed paying Ignacio a visit. It’s safe to say I always looked very ‘local’ whenever I stepped out of Ignacio’s barbers. 

I always appreciated Annie taking on a local Vejeriega from the town to assist her. Pepi loves her job and despite born, raised and still living in Vejer, she has been exposed to a host of different cultures and people through her job. And of course, who better is there to teach you an authentic Andalucían paella which features on the course. The memory I had from preparing and eating this paella gave me no choice but to cook it again for my series, but this time in Pepi’s own kitchen. In fact Pepi was delighted when I asked her, which delighted me because I was desperate to share the recipe. 

Paella is a staple across the entire eastern and southern coast of Spain (from the Costa Brava in Cataluña to the Costa de la Luz in Cádiz). Unlike, for example, a Valencian paella that typically features meat (rabbit, chicken, even snails) with green beans, an Andalucían paella celebrates fish and notably shellfish. What fascinated me most about cooking this dish was that Pepi would regularly mix the rice. I was so used to leaving the dish once adding the rice because of paella rice's sensitive structure. My evening cooking with Pepi was not just a run through of a typical paella and salmorejo for starters, but a lesson in Andalucían cookery (aka a dream). My tip here is to prepare your own stock with the heads and shells of the prawns you will use and to not hold back on the saffron.

Salmorejo

Recipe found here

pepitwo
pepifour

Paella de Pepi

Serves 6 - 8

You will need 3 pans for this marathon dish and a visit to the fish market is a must. A paella pan is not essential

This paella is an effort, but I can promise you now it’s completely worth it. Again, prepare your own stock…

 

Ingredients  

Olive Oil

Onion - 1 large

Red Pepper - 1

Green Pepper - 1

Tomatoes - 4

Fresh Mussels - 1kg

Cuttlefish - 700g (calamari a good alternative) 

Gambas - 500g (reserve heads & shells for stock, leaving some in their shells for decoration)

Clams - 500g

Bomba Rice - 2 cups

Stock - 6 cups

Saffron - 1/4 cup (refer to video)

Sea Salt

Monkfish - 1 fillet (filleted) 

Lemon - 1

Fresh Parsley - handful

pepifive
pepisix

Method

Prepare everything - chop your veg, peel and deseed your tomatoes, clean your mussels and clams, slice your fish and fillet if required, behead and skin your prawns (reserving some for decoration) - be ready

Sofrito - heat a good glug of olive oil in your pan on a medium heat and begin by frying your chopped onion and red pepper. After a couple of minutes add the chopped green pepper and then your roughly chopped tomatoes 

Mussels - boil in another pan with plenty of water for just a few minutes until they begin to open. Drain and discard any whose shells are still closed. Once cool enough to handle, remove the meat from the shells (reserving a few in their shells for decoration)

Cuttlefish - add to the main pan and coat in the sofrito. Pepi suggests adding the fish once the water from the sofrito has evaporated

Prawn heads & shells - add olive oil to the same pan used to boil your mussels on a medium heat and fry the heads and shells of the prawns. After a few minutes add 600ml to the pan and bring to the boil. Once boiling, turn the heat down and simmer gently for at least 20 minutes

Clams - drain the stock water into another pan and discard the heads & shells of the prawns. Bring the stock back to the boil and add the clams. Boil until the shells begin to open then drain from the pan and keep for later, reserving the stock water as well. (Once cool you can remove the clam meat from their shells if you wish. I prefer to keep them intact)

Rice - add 2 cups to the main pan and coat well in the juices

Stock & Saffron - add 6 cups of stock to the pan with a really good pinch of saffron dissolved. Pepi suggests that you add 3 cups of stock for every cup of rice

Salt - season well with sea salt and give the dish a good stir

Monkfish - once the stock soon starts to bubble, add the monkfish

Prawns, Mussels, Clams - once the rice is almost cooked (after approx. 15 minutes) stir in the raw prawns with the cooked mussels and clams. Mix again. When the prawns have turned pink, turn the heat off and leave to rest. Pepi says there should still be some liquid left at this point 

Add olive oil to a separate pan and fry the reserved prawns in their shells on a high heat until pink

Decorate the dish with the prawns and muscles in their shells, lemon wedges and fresh parsley

pepieight